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Dr Nitya Mohan Khemka

Dr Nitya Mohan Khemka

Affiliated Lecturer, Centre of Development Studies

Visiting Lecturer, Centre of South Asian Studies

Fellow Commoner, Clare Hall

M.Phil., Ph.D. (Cantab)


Biography:

Dr Nitya Mohan Khemka is an Affiliated Lecturer at the Centre of Development Studies at the University of Cambridge. She lectures on paper 340: Gender and Development.  Prior to this, she worked with the UNDP (India Country Office) and ILO (Geneva, Switzerland). Her research interests span the areas of governance reform, health economics and development policy, notably topics such as well-being, gender inequality, human development, the effectiveness of the welfare state and decentralization of governance.

Nitya has a PhD. and an M.Phil. in Development Studies from the University of Cambridge, and an M.A. in Economics and a B.Sc. in Mathematics from Bangalore University.

Research Interests

Nitya’s current research focuses on enabling the Indian Welfare State in the 21st century. In this capacity she leads the "Action to Improve Public Service Access and Delivery" project (focussed on the delivery of healthcare, education and social security by the state) in Bihar, India, jointly funded by the EU.  Her current academic and professional research interests are focussed on localizing the Sustainable Development Goals for Indian States as well as examining the efficacy of key governance and welfare policy initiatives at the national and sub-national levels. She is also working on a study that is interested in understanding local conceptualisations of quality in education at the village level.

Teaching

Nitya lectures in the Centre of Development Studies on dynamics of gender relations against the backdrop of the realities of home and field (the informal sector, mining, agriculture, industry, service sector). She also lectures on the link between institutions and health systems as well as key approaches to build institutional capacity of health and education systems at the local level.

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